red-lipstick:

Ralph Crane aka Ralph Rudy Crane (German, 1913-1988) - Owners With Their Black Cats, Waiting In Line For Audition In Movie “Tales Of Terror”, 1961 (Life Magazine)

(Source: art.com, via acrylicalchemy)

Timestamp: 1411952493

red-lipstick:

Ralph Crane aka Ralph Rudy Crane (German, 1913-1988) - Owners With Their Black Cats, Waiting In Line For Audition In Movie “Tales Of Terror”, 1961 (Life Magazine)

(Source: art.com, via acrylicalchemy)

instagram:

Spotting Cotton Candy Colors with @aurelycerise

For an extra dose of cotton candy-color, follow @aurelycerise on Instagram.

Aurely Cerise (@aurelycerise ) chases rainbows of color, and she describes her photography as “fresh” and smile-inducing. “My friends say my art brings happiness,” says the Paris Instagrammer. With color being her creative trigger, Aurely looks at everyday objects and naturally starts composing still life scenes. Whether it’s masking tape, pencils or a cup of coffee, Aurely enjoys arranging random things and capturing them from particular perspectives. “It’s funny to see how many things could be really beautiful when you only change your point of view,” she says. Organizing also helps to overcome her natural anxiety. “When I create a set-up it allows me to channel my stress.”

When Aurely is not out and about capturing colorful sceneries, she lets her creative juices flow in front of a canvas. “This photo explains how i imagine creation. Nothing is planned, the feelings are getting out from my brush and start creating forms.” Her simple advice for finding joy: “Put some color in your life.”

Timestamp: 1411941704

instagram:

Spotting Cotton Candy Colors with @aurelycerise

For an extra dose of cotton candy-color, follow @aurelycerise on Instagram.

Aurely Cerise (@aurelycerise ) chases rainbows of color, and she describes her photography as “fresh” and smile-inducing. “My friends say my art brings happiness,” says the Paris Instagrammer. With color being her creative trigger, Aurely looks at everyday objects and naturally starts composing still life scenes. Whether it’s masking tape, pencils or a cup of coffee, Aurely enjoys arranging random things and capturing them from particular perspectives. “It’s funny to see how many things could be really beautiful when you only change your point of view,” she says. Organizing also helps to overcome her natural anxiety. “When I create a set-up it allows me to channel my stress.”

When Aurely is not out and about capturing colorful sceneries, she lets her creative juices flow in front of a canvas. “This photo explains how i imagine creation. Nothing is planned, the feelings are getting out from my brush and start creating forms.” Her simple advice for finding joy: “Put some color in your life.”

exhibition-ism:

Jessica Wohl embroiders vintage photographs in her “Hand Dseries 

Timestamp: 1409619681

exhibition-ism:

Jessica Wohl embroiders vintage photographs in her “Hand Dseries 

misterios-da-alma:

History of Art

(via acrylicalchemy)

Timestamp: 1409576480

misterios-da-alma:

History of Art

(via acrylicalchemy)

fastcodesign:

These “Impossible” Dresses Will Melt Your Brain

We live in a relatively simple three-dimensional world. Objects have discernible volumes with values that add up logically. But what happens when we bend the rules, or break them?

You get Hard Copy, a project by Tel Aviv-based designer Noa Raviv. She loads 3-D rendering software with what she calls “impossible commands”—crazy requests that she knows will break the software, forcing it to regurgitate a shape that has no foundational basis in our physical world.

“Like a square that lives in four dimensions?” I ask.

“Exactly,” she says.

Read More>

Timestamp: 1409101280

fastcodesign:

These “Impossible” Dresses Will Melt Your Brain

We live in a relatively simple three-dimensional world. Objects have discernible volumes with values that add up logically. But what happens when we bend the rules, or break them?

You get Hard Copy, a project by Tel Aviv-based designer Noa Raviv. She loads 3-D rendering software with what she calls “impossible commands”—crazy requests that she knows will break the software, forcing it to regurgitate a shape that has no foundational basis in our physical world.

“Like a square that lives in four dimensions?” I ask.

“Exactly,” she says.

Read More>